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Growing Pak Choi

Growing Pak Choi
Growing Pak Choi

When semi-mature or completely developed, pak choi can be used in salads or stir-fries as baby leaves or as a cooked vegetable in a variety of Oriental recipes.

Sow in a sunny location in fertile soil from April to July. Sow seeds thinly in rows 30–38cm (12–15in) apart, 2cm (344in) deep – the greater spacing is preferable for producing semi-mature to full-sized plants.

Thin out seedlings gradually to avoid overcrowding and allow them more room to thrive. The thinnings can be used in salads. The final spacings are determined by the stage of harvesting:

After 30 days, you can pick the young leaves to use in salads. The plants should have formed a “heart” and be ready to harvest for stir-fries after 45 days. The Only harvest what you need when you need it because pak choi is most succulent and has the finest flavor when eaten fresh from the plot.

This fast-growing vegetable can be planted in early spring for a spring-to-early-summer harvest or in late summer and early fall for a mid-to-late-fall harvest, whether grown from seeds or nursery seedlings. For a longer harvest season, succession plants every couple of weeks.

In the United States, bok choy grows as an annual in every hardiness zone. It thrives in milder temperatures; dry, hot weather might cause bok choy to bolt too soon. This vegetable is not as cold-hardy as smaller-leaved Asian greens, but it can survive mild winters undercover in USDA Hardiness Zones 4 to 7. It may, however, bolt to seed next spring.

Growing Pak Choi
Growing Pak Choi

When planting bok choy, amend the soil with compost and organic fertilizer. These plants are heavy feeders, preferring potassium, nitrogen, and phosphorus-rich soil. Organic feeding, on the other hand, should be done at the time of planting. During this time, chemical fertilizers should be avoided.

Written by umerviz_ejig7cij

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