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Belgian Who Created Tintin

Belgian Who Created Tintin
Belgian Who Created Tintin

Belgian Who Created Tintin: Hergé is the pen name of Belgian cartoonist Georgés Remi, who is most known for creating the comic strip hero Tintin, who is a teenage journalist. In the ensuing half-century, Tintin’s adventures filled 23 albums and sold 70 million copies in more than 30 languages worldwide. With his characteristic blond quiff and plus fours, the young reporter remained instantly recognizable over the years, even as his appearance changed.

Totor de la Patrouille des Hannetons (“Totor of the June Bug Patrol”), written by Hergé for Le Boy-Scout Belge (“The Belgian Boy Scout”), was published in Le Boy-Scout Belge (“The Belgian Boy Scout”) when Hergé was just 19 years old. Hergé was given his pen name because of the pronunciation of his transposed initials. His Tintin character was first published in 1929 as part of the children’s section (a weekly feature known as Le Petit Ventième) of the daily newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle.

There is much more to Tintin than merely being a brave hero fighting for the righteous cause with a pure heart. He is the focal point of a complicated cosmos in which we are forced to confront our own reality.

Adding color, dimension, and perspective to his world are characters such as Captain Haddock, Professor Calculus, Bianca Castafiore, and Thompson & Thomson. Tintin is a one-of-a-kind collection of characteristics that combines magnificent stories, crisp line visuals, and topics that are universally appealing.

Belgian Who Created Tintin
Belgian Who Created Tintin

Georges Prosper Remi, named by the French pronunciation of his initials, was a Belgian cartoonist who worked in the field of political cartooning. His most well-known work is the creation of The Adventures of Tintin, a series of comic albums that is widely regarded as one of the most successful European comic books of the twentieth century.

He was also the creator of two additional well-known series, Quick & Flupke (1930–1940) and The Adventures of Jo, Zette, and Jocko (1936–1957), both of which were produced by Warner Bros. His drawings were done in his distinctive ligne claire manner, which is still evident today.

Hergé was born in Etterbeek, Brussels, to a lower-middle-class family and began his professional career by supplying graphics to Scouting periodicals. In 1926, he created his first comic book, The Adventures of Totor, for the Belgian magazine Le Boy-Scout Belge. He wrote The Adventures of Tintin in 1929 on the advice of Norbert Wallez, the editor of the conservative Catholic weekly Le Vingtième Siècle, while working for the publication.

With stories centered on the exploits of young reporter Tintin and his canine companion Snowy, the series’ first three editions — Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, Tintin in the Congo, and Tintin in America — were intended as conservative propaganda for children.

Belgian Who Created Tintin
Belgian Who Created Tintin

After being widely popular in France, the stories were reprinted in book form, with Hergé continuing the series and also creating the Quick & Flupke and Jo, Zette, and Jocko series for Le Vingtième Siècle, which was also widely popular in France.

As a result of his friendship with Zhang Chongren, Hergé began to place a larger emphasis on performing background research for his stories starting in 1934, which resulted in a heightened sense of realism in his stories starting with The Blue Lotus. Although Le Vingtième Siècle was shuttered after the German annexation of Belgium in 1940, Hergé resumed his work in Le Soir, a popular newspaper controlled by the Nazi regime.

Belgian Who Created Tintin
Belgian Who Created Tintin

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